The Learner

This chapter was all about how to better teach your students. I found the section about teaching English to students of other languages helpful. The authors mentioned the demographic imperative and that was interesting to me. One of my worries is that I won’t be able to communicate with my students. If they can’t speak English then it makes it very difficult to teach anything, or see what they need help with. Lincoln is a diverse area, and I have students of many different ethnic backgrounds in my practicum class. Fortunately they all speak English, but I know that won’t always be the case. It’s good to know that there are ways to communicate and help those students that can’t speak fluent English.

Poverty in schools was another section in this chapter. While I was reading this part I thought about some of the students I work with. Many of them don’t have great home lives and it shows sometimes in their appearance. Many students wear the same clothes to school everyday, and look like they haven’t showered in a while. Hygiene can be a big issue when it comes to your students. I know one student in my class is very insecure because they don’t get to shower as often as they would like and that affects their academic performance. They don’t attend school as regularly as they should because they feel embarrassed. Poverty in students is a problem because it can effect their education in a big way. Some students might not be able to study or do their homework because they have to work to provide for their families. As a teacher I think it is important to understand your student’s home life and provide emotional support for them. Even though you might not be able to help them directly, there are other ways you can help.

calpovThis is a photo of students in California attending a food bank. Poverty is a large issue in many school districts around the country.

Picture from: http://www.ibtimes.com/fools-gold-california-has-highest-poverty-rate-united-states-1548707

 

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